Nutrition for Women

women

Avoid yo-yo dieting

You’ve been working out and dieting to fit into that favorite bikini of yours, and you’ve finally done it! But life gets busy, and you have trouble making time to work out and eat well. That bikini starts looking a little tight, and before you know it, fitting into that tiny thing is something of the past …unless you go on another diet. It’s a vicious cycle that keeps repeating. Yo-yo dieting affects your hormones and can increase your risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. Instead, focus on adopting a healthier lifestyle by incorporating healthy habits into your everyday life.

Weight Loss

Weight loss is a popular health trend among women, but it is not without caution. Many women try to control their weight by reducing carbohydrates and reducing fat.

Carbohydrates

When first beginning a low-carb diet, the body almost immediately has a reduction in water weight. A majority of fat is also lost from the abdominal area, and this is very beneficial. However, your brain needs at least 130 grams of carbs a day to function. Try to make the source of your carbohydrates complex, such as those from whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.

Fats

Healthy fats should comprise 25-35% of your daily calories. A low-fat diet can decrease your risk for obesity and heart disease.

There are good fats and bad fats. Saturated fats are “bad” fats and t fried foods, dairy, and red meat contain high levels. Instead, choose baked options over fried, low-fat dairy, and lean meats like turkey, chicken, or fish. Unsaturated fats are the “good” fats and they can be found in olive oil, nuts, avocado, eggs, and fish. Focus on decreasing the “bad” saturated fats and increasing the “good” unsaturated fats.

Battle those menstrual cramps! 

Anti-inflammatory foods can help with cramps. Try:

  • Nuts
  • Fish
  • Soy
  • Olive oil
  • Berries
  • Herbal teas

Acne fighting foods:orange

  • Almonds
  • Watermelon
  • Green Tea
  • Oranges
  • Carrots
  • Spinach
  • Fig
  • Whole grains

For more information, visit:

 http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/acne/features/lifestyle 

 

Created by Alexandria Faubion, TTU Dietetic Intern
Hospitality Dietitian | Mindy Diller, MS, RDN, LD |  mindy.diller@ttu.edu

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